Part of Me Blog

camera myths • what camera should you buy?

lissa-anglinComment

It's one of the questions I get asked the most:

I want to buy a nice camera that takes great pictures. Which one should I buy?

There are MANY great options on the market- but I have to say- you're asking the wrong question....because my answer is:

It really doesn't matter. 


As long as you buy a new-ish (made in the past 5 years or so) DSLR (one that can change lenses) camera made by a major brand (i.e. Canon or Nikon), you're good. Any camera that has been made that recently will be more than capable of taking the photos you desire. 

Trust me, I know- my first real, professional Nikon was a 2 megapixel camera. TWO MEGAPIXELS. I made HUGE prints from those image files...and now my iPhone shoots images triple that size!

In fact, if you are eBay savvy, you can get some great deals buying cameras used! That's right- I buy most all of my equipment used or refurbished. Of course, I do have my equipment serviced yearly by the Nikon factory to be sure it is in great working shape. 

You can also rent a camera from places like The Lens Depot or Borrow Lenses so that you can have a test drive before you buy.

If you still need to be told the EXACT camera you should buy, check out Recommended Cameras on KenRockwell.com. I have loved Ken's reviews and found them to be accurate throughout my career.

What DOES matter- is the lens you're putting on that camera. 

Your lens is essentially the "eye" of your camera, and your camera body is the brain. If your eyes can't see well, they won't be able to help the brain create a very good image. 

So, if you're the average DSLR hobbyist or just starting out- get a good camera body- and then choose to really invest in great lenses. 

More info in this video, and some helpful links for you below:

P.S. This is the lens I recommend for your first lens purchase! It doesn't do everything, but it packs a punch for it's small size and price! ----> Nikon  Canon

Here's a great article on a crop sensor vs. full frame sensor.